An easy Greek pita bread recipe made from scratch. All you do is make a simple dough, let it rise, roll it out and cook it on the stove for a couple of minutes on each side. What you'll have is a pita bread that's soft, pliable and perfect for using as a wrap for your favourite filling. Chicken souvlaki perhaps?
Sides & Sauces

Greek Pita Bread

August 31, 2018
image_pdfimage_print

An easy Greek pita bread recipe made from scratch. All you do is make a simple dough, let it rise, roll it out and cook it on the stove for a couple of minutes on each side. What you’ll have is a pita bread that’s soft, pliable and perfect for using as a wrap for your favourite filling. Chicken souvlaki perhaps?

An easy Greek pita bread recipe made from scratch. All you do is make a simple dough, let it rise, roll it out and cook it on the stove for a couple of minutes on each side. What you'll have is a pita bread that's soft, pliable and perfect for using as a wrap for your favourite filling. 

This is my go to recipe whenever l’m in the mood for making homemade Greek pita bread. It’s soft, light and doesn’t break when used as a wrap.

An easy Greek pita bread recipe made from scratch. All you do is make a simple dough, let it rise, roll it out and cook it on the stove for a couple of minutes on each side. What you'll have is a pita bread that's soft, pliable and perfect for using as a wrap for your favourite filling.   An easy Greek pita bread recipe made from scratch. All you do is make a simple dough, let it rise, roll it out and cook it on the stove for a couple of minutes on each side. What you'll have is a pita bread that's soft, pliable and perfect for using as a wrap for your favourite filling.   An easy Greek pita bread recipe made from scratch. All you do is make a simple dough, let it rise, roll it out and cook it on the stove for a couple of minutes on each side. What you'll have is a pita bread that's soft, pliable and perfect for using as a wrap for your favourite filling. 

WHY DOES MY DOUGH KEEP SPRINGING BACK WHEN I TRY TO ROLL IT OUT ?

I have googled this question numerous times trying to find an answer. One possibility could be that the gluten in the flour hasn’t rested enough, hence it keeps springing back.

By the time you realise this is the case, the dough would have already been divided up into portions. Try covering the portions with a damp tea towel, and allow them to rest for a further 15-20 minutes.

An easy Greek pita bread recipe made from scratch. All you do is make a simple dough, let it rise, roll it out and cook it on the stove for a couple of minutes on each side. What you'll have is a pita bread that's soft, pliable and perfect for using as a wrap for your favourite filling. Chicken souvlaki perhaps?   An easy Greek pita bread recipe made from scratch. All you do is make a simple dough, let it rise, roll it out and cook it on the stove for a couple of minutes on each side. What you'll have is a pita bread that's soft, pliable and perfect for using as a wrap for your favourite filling. 

An easy Greek pita bread recipe made from scratch. All you do is make a simple dough, let it rise, roll it out and cook it on the stove for a couple of minutes on each side. What you'll have is a pita bread that's soft, pliable and perfect for using as a wrap for your favourite filling. Chicken souvlaki perhaps?

Tonight, l’m working on a flaky flat bread recipe (no yeast).  Fingers crossed it works out 🤞

Danielle

Preparation Time: 20 mins     Cooking Time: 10 mins     Servings: 4

See note 3 for rising time.

Ingredients

  • 250 g / 9 oz plain /all purpose flour, plus 2 – 3 tsps extra (note 1)
  • 175 ml / 6 fl oz warm water (note 2)
  • 7 oz / 0.2 oz dry yeast (2 tsps)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp white sugar

Instructions

  1. Place 2 tbsp of the warm water in a small bowl. Add the yeast and sugar. In a few minutes, the mixture will start to react, becoming frothy on the surface. Allow 8 – 10 minutes for the yeast to fully dissolve.
  2. Place the flour and salt in a medium – large bowl. Make a well in the middle.
  3. Add the yeast mixture and the remainder of the water to the dry ingredients. Use a large spoon to mix the ingredients until they form a shaggy mess. Use one hand to bring the mixture together.
  4. Tip the dough onto a clean, dry work surface. Knead for 10 minutes. It may feel a little sticky at the start, but will begin to form a smooth dough once kneaded. If it feels way too sticky, sprinkle 1 teaspoon of flour over the dough and continue kneading (note 3). Repeat if necessary.
  5. Oil the same bowl you mixed the dough in. Place the dough inside. Oil the top of the dough. Place cling wrap over the bowl. Cover with a tea towel and place in a warm spot for at least 2 hours. Depending on the weather, it may or may not double in size (note 4).
  6. Tip the dough onto your work surface. Shape into a log. Cut into 4 equal size portions. Form mozzarella shaped balls (see photo).
  7. Roll out each portion into a circle 18 cm / 7 ” in diameter. Cover with a damp tea towel.
  8. Warm a pan over medium high heat. Drizzle 1 -2  tsp of oil in the pan, wipe off excess.
  9. Lay out one of the portions in the pan. Cook until it begins to puff up. Continue to cook until you see toasted spots on the underside.
  10. Flip and cook the other side (1 -2 mins). Remove from the pan. Repeat with the remaining portions.
  11. Stack the cooked portions and cover with a tea towel to maintain softness.

Notes

  1. I buy strong, high protein flour (bread flour). It’s readily available at supermarkets.
  2. If the water is too hot, it will kill the yeast.
  3. If too much flour is added, you may end up with a hard pita bread. Your dough should not feel dry; moisture in the dough helps it to puff up. Don’t be fooled into adding too much flour too soon. The more you knead, the less sticky your dough will become. Just be patient.
  4. Adding oil to the surface of the dough prevents it from sticking to the cling wrap. Finding a warm spot during winter can be problematic, which means that my dough doesn’t rise as well as it would during warmer months. To help things along, turn the oven on for 2 minutes at 100 C / 200 F. Turn it off and place the dough inside with a tea towel over the top.  In summer, in a warm room, it takes my dough roughly an hour to double in size. In winter, it doesn’t rise as much, even after 2 hours. Not to worry, the dough still puffs up when it is being cooked (and still tastes delicious).

You Might Also Like...

No Comments

    Leave a Reply

    NEVER MISS A RECIPE

    Don't miss my next recipe
    Join my FREE email list
    SUBSCRIBE
    close-link