The softest, most pliable roti you'll EVER have. Made without yeast, soft roti is excellent for dunking into dahl or curries. My special tip will also tell you exactly what makes these roti so super soft! 
Sides & Sauces

Soft Roti

March 24, 2019
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The softest, most pliable roti you’ll EVER have. Made without yeast, soft roti is excellent for dunking into dahl or curries. My special tip will also tell you exactly what makes these roti so super soft!

The softest, most pliable roti you'll EVER have. Made without yeast, soft roti is excellent for dunking into dahl or curries. My special tip will also tell you exactly what makes these roti so super soft!  

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE TEXTURE

You might be more familiar with the thicker, crunchier flat breads such as naan or even Greek pita bread.

This is different!

These roti are super soft AND paper-thin. The consistency of the dough, not too dry or too wet, makes them pliable enough to fold without cracking, and firm enough for scooping up sauces or curries.

There are a couple of other reasons why l enjoy making this flat bread over others:

  • There’s no yeast involved, which makes prep time very short.
  • Kneading time is also short, about 1 – 2 minutes.
  • If well covered, can stay soft for a day or two.

THE MOST IMPORTANT TIP FOR A SOFT ROTI

To get that beautiful soft texture, you need to use boiling water. I may not know the science behind it, but l do know that my roti is amazingly soft.

The extra tips below also help create that softness:

  • Rub the butter evenly through the flour.
  • Roll out the dough until you have a very thin disc.
  • Use moderate heat. If the heat is too high, the roti will be dry. Be prepared to turn down the heat if necessary.

When l’m rolling out my roti, I rarely achieve those perfectly formed circles. And it really doesn’t matter if they are a bit wonky. Even though my circles may not be precise, l highly recommend you follow my instructions as they prevent the roti from sticking to the work surface, making it impossible to lift them off (see Rolling out the Roti under instructions).

An utterly delicious Red Lentil Dahl recipe that is fragrant, full of flavour, and highly nutritious too. It's very easy to make, and since there's no pre-soaking required it can be on the table in under 30 minutes.

Whether your soft roti turns out perfectly formed or a bit on the wonky side, you now have a recipe that’s easy and gives you the softest roti ever.

Danielle
PS Soft Roti goes beautifully with my Red Lentil Dahl recipe.

Preparation Time: 10 mins
Cook Time: 20 mins
Servings: 15 pieces

Ingredients (note 1)

  • 250 g / 9 oz plain / all purpose flour
  • 40 g / 1.5 oz softened butter
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 175 ml / 6 fl oz boiling water

Instructions

Making the Dough

  1. Place the flour, salt and softened butter in a medium sized bowl.
  2. Use your fingers to rub the butter through the flour. Make sure the butter has been evenly distributed.
  3. Make a well in the middle of the mixture. Pour the boiling water in the centre. I use a spoon to mix the water through the flour. Then l use my hands to shape the dough into a ball.
  4. Place the dough onto a lightly floured work surface and knead for 1 – 2 minutes. The dough should feel very soft. Roll the dough into a log shape.

Rolling out the Roti

  1. Cut or pinch off 30 g / 1 oz portions of dough. Roll into small balls. Set aside. You should have about 15. Cover with a tea towel to prevent drying out.
  2. Place one ball on a lightly floured work surface. Flatten with the palm of your hand.
  3. Using a rolling pin or similar (note 2), start at the bottom edge of the dough and roll towards the top edge.
  4. Lift the dough and make a quarter turn. Roll again, starting at the bottom edge of the dough and roll towards the top edge. Continue rolling out and turning until you have a very thin circle measuring 14 cm / 5 1/2″ in diameter (note 3).

Cooking the Roti

  1. Heat a lightly oiled frypan over moderate heat (note 4). Place one or more roti in the frypan and cook for about 30 seconds. Bubbles will begin to form on the surface. In most recipes l would say no peeking, but here you can. You should see golden spots forming on the underside.
  2. Flip the roti over and cook the other side for roughly 20 – 30 seconds. Keep peeking. If the roti colours too quickly or burns, turn the heat down. Use a spatula to lift the roti out of the frypan. Place on a plate.
  3. Fold the cooked roti in half (note 5). Cover with a tea towel.
  4. Continue with the remainder of the dough.

Notes

  1. It is really important that the measurements are precise. A little extra water or butter will make the dough too sticky and not enough will make it dry. It’s best to get down to eye level when measuring the water. If, for some reason you find that your dough is too sticky, (slightly sticky is fine) add a little flour.
  2. My ‘rolling pin’ is a wooden dowl rod that l purchased from a hardware store for less than $5.
  3. Lifting and turning the roti is important, otherwise they will stick to the work surface.
  4. I use a small frypan and cook my roti one by one. I suggest doing it this way until you get the hang of it. Once you get the gist, you could use a larger frypan and cook two or three at the same time.
  5. If cooked too long or if the heat is too high, your roti will dry out and therefore will split when you try to fold them. It may take a couple of goes until you get it right.

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2 Comments

  • Avatar
    Reply
    G+T
    April 3, 2019 at 7:33 am

    Superb. Recipe gave us a great result which was delightful mopping up the Red Lentil Dahl.

    • Danielle
      Reply
      Danielle
      April 3, 2019 at 6:52 pm

      Fantastic. Glad you enjoyed.

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